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Helping Men in the Battle against Cancer

The cancer teams at ProMedica Cancer Institute are especially trained to help men with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. From our technology to support groups, we have the programs and services men need as they move from assessment, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

Prostate Cancer Support Group

ProMedica Cancer Institute and ProMedica St. Luke’s Hospital offer a free support group and opportunity for men to talk about their concern for others who are facing prostate cancer. In addition, participants learn and discuss information about treatments, side effects and other topics related to prostate cancer. Spouses and caregivers are encouraged to attend as well. Meetings are free and confidential. Refreshments are available. The Prostate Cancer Support Group is every second Thursday of the month at 1 p.m. at ProMedica St. Luke’s Hospital, Classroom 1, 5901 Monclova Rd., Maumee.

Cancer Facts for Men

The cancers that most frequently affect men are prostate, colon, lung, and skin cancers. Knowing about these cancers and how they can be prevented or found early can save your life.

The most common cancers among men are:

  • Prostate cancer (126.1): First among men of all races and Hispanic* origin populations.
  • Lung cancer (74.1): Second among men of all races and Hispanic* origin populations.
  • Colorectal cancer (46.4): Third among men of all races and Hispanic* origin populations.

The leading causes of cancer death among men are:

  • Lung cancer (60.1): First among men of all races and Hispanic* origin populations.
  • Prostate cancer (21.8): Second among white, black, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Hispanic* men; fourth among Asian/Pacific Islander men.
  • Colorectal cancer (18.7): Third among men of all races and Hispanic* origin populations.
  • Liver cancer: Second among Asian/Pacific Islander men.
    • Flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years*, or
    • Colonoscopy every 10 years, or
    • Double-contrast barium enema every 5 years*, or
    • CT colonography (virtual colonoscopy) every 5 years*
    • Yearly fecal occult blood test (FOBT)**, or
    • Yearly fecal immunochemical test (FIT)**, or
    • Stool DNA test (sDNA), interval uncertain**
    • Stay away from tobacco.
    • Stay at a healthy weight.
    • Get moving with regular physical activity.
    • Eat healthy with plenty of fruits and vegetables.
    • Limit how much alcohol you drink (if you drink at all).
    • Protect your skin.
    • Know yourself, your family history, and your risks.
    • Have regular check-ups and cancer screening tests.
    • Stay away from tobacco.
    • Stay at a healthy weight.
    • Get moving with regular physical activity.
    • Eat healthy with plenty of fruits and vegetables.
    • Limit how much alcohol you drink (if you drink at all).
    • Protect your skin.
    • Know yourself, your family history, and your risks.
    • Have regular check-ups and cancer screening tests
  • Note: The numbers in parentheses are the rates per 100,000 men of all races and Hispanic* origins combined in the United States.

    Source: U.S. Cancer Statistics Working Group. United States Cancer Statistics: 1999–2010 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report. Atlanta (GA): Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Cancer Institute; 2013. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/uscs.

    *Hispanic origin is not mutually exclusive from race categories (white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaska Native).

    Prostate Cancer

    The chance of getting prostate cancer goes up as a man gets older. Most prostate cancers are found in men over the age of 65. For reasons that are still unknown, African American men are more likely than white men to develop prostate cancer. Having one or more close relatives with prostate cancer also increases a man’s risk of having prostate cancer.

    What You Can Do

    The American Cancer Society recommends that men make an informed decision with a doctor about whether to be tested for prostate cancer. Research has not yet proven that the benefits of testing outweigh the harms of testing and treatment. The American Cancer Society believes that men should not be tested without learning about what we know and don’t know about the risks and possible benefits of testing and treatment.

    A prostate specific antigen (PSA) test may find a prostate health problem, but treatment can cause serious side effects. Learn about prostate cancer and talk to your doctor before you decide to get tested or treated for prostate cancer. Starting at age 50, talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of testing so you can decide if getting tested is the right choice for you.

    Colon Cancer

    Any adult can have colorectal cancers (cancers of the colon and rectum), but most of these cancers are found in people age 50 or older. People with a personal or family history of this cancer, or who have polyps in their colon or rectum, or those with inflammatory bowel disease are more likely to have colon cancer. Also, eating a diet mostly of high-fat foods (especially from animal sources), being overweight, smoking, and being inactive can make a person more likely to have colon cancer.

    What You Can Do

    Colon cancer almost always starts with a polyp. Testing can save lives by finding polyps before they become cancer. If pre-cancerous polyps are removed, colon cancer can be prevented. Eating a low-fat diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables may also make you less likely to have this cancer.

    The American Cancer Society recommends one of the following testing options for all people beginning at age 50:

    Tests that find polyps and cancer:

    Tests that primarily find cancer:

    * If the test is positive, a colonoscopy should be done.

    ** The multiple stool take-home test should be used. One test done by the doctor is not adequate for testing. A colonoscopy should be done if the test is positive.

    The tests that are designed to find both early cancer and polyps are preferred if these tests are available to you and you are willing to have one of these more invasive tests. Talk to your doctor about which test is best for you.

    Lung Cancer

    Smoking is the cause for more than 80 percent of all lung cancers, but people who do not smoke can also have lung cancer.

    What You Can Do

    Lung cancer is one of the few cancers that can often be prevented. If you are a smoker, ask your doctor or nurse to help you quit. If you don’t smoke, don’t start, and avoid breathing in other people’s smoke. If your friends and loved ones are smokers, help them quit. For help quitting, call your American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 and ask about our Quit For Life® Program, a tobacco-cessation service operated by Alere Wellbeing.

    Skin Cancer

    Anyone who spends time in the sun can have skin cancer. People with fair skin, especially those with blond or red hair, are more likely to get skin cancer than people with darker coloring. People who have had a close family member with melanoma and those who had severe sunburns before the age of 18 are more likely to get skin cancer.

    What You Can Do

    Most skin cancers can be prevented by avoiding the midday sun. When in the sun, wear hats with brims, long-sleeve shirts, sunglasses, and use sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher on all exposed parts of the skin. If you have children, protect them from the sun and don’t let them get sunburned. Be aware of all moles and spots on your skin, and report any changes to your doctor right away. Have a skin exam during your regular health check-ups.

    The Best Defense against Cancer

    Early Detection

    Early detection, or finding a cancer early before it has spread, gives you the best chance to do something about it. Knowing about these cancers and what you can do can save your life.

    By following these steps, you can help to take control of your health and reduce your cancer risk:

Cancer Toolkit

Use the tools below to prevent, treat and get support for cancer.

Friends for Life Newsletter

Becoming a Friends for Life member is quick and easy. Just fill out the form below with a few details about yourself. Look for your newsletter around the 11th of each month.

Sign up for the Friends for Life Newsletter

Connect with Us on Facebook

If you would like to connect to other people – just like you – undergoing treatment for cancer, connect with us on Facebook. Here, we hope that you will share your story and find other patients to connect with.

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Cancer Events

View a list below of cancer events, including survivor celebrations and screenings, which are offered at locations throughout ProMedica.

View cancer events