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Bladder biopsy

Definition

Bladder biopsy is a procedure that involves removing a small piece of tissue from the bladder for examination.

Alternative Names

Biopsy - bladder

How the test is performed

A bladder biopsy is usually performed as a part of a cystoscopy. A small portion of tissue or the entire area of concern is removed and sent to the laboratory for analysis if:

  • Abnormalities of the bladder are found during this examination
  • A tumor is visible

How to prepare for the test

You must sign an informed consent form before you have a bladder biopsy. Usually you are asked to urinate just before the procedure. You may also be asked to take an antibiotic before the procedure.

For infants and children, the preparation you can provide for this test depends on your child's age, previous experiences, and level of trust. For general information regarding how you can prepare your child, see the following topics:

How the test will feel

There may be slight discomfort as the cystoscope (a lighted instrument used to look at the bladder) is passed through your urethra into your bladder. You will feel an uncomfortable sensation -- similar to a strong urge to urinate -- when the fluid has filled your bladder.

You may feel a pinch during the biopsy. There may be a burning sensation when the blood vessels are sealed to stop bleeding (cauterized).

After the cystoscope is removed, your urethra may be sore. You may experience a burning sensation during urination for a day or two.

Sometimes when the suspicious area is larger, you will need general or spinal anesthesia to remove the area in question.

Why the test is performed

This test is most often performed to check for cancer of the bladder or urethra.

Normal Values

The bladder wall is smooth. The bladder is of a normal size, shape, and position. There are no obstructions, growths, or stones.

What abnormal results mean

The presence of cancer cells indicates bladder cancer. The type of cancer can be determined from the biopsy sample.

Other abnormalities may include:

What the risks are

There is some risk of urinary tract infection.

There is slight risk of excessive bleeding or rupturing of the bladder wall with the cystoscope or during biopsy.

Special considerations

A small amount of blood is usually passed in the urine shortly after this procedure. If the bleeding continues after the time you urinate, contact your health care provider.

Contact your health care provider if:

  • You have pain, chills, or fever
  • Your urine output is lower than usual (oliguria)
  • You cannot urinate despite a strong feeling to do so

References

Carter HB, Chan DY. Basic instrumentation and cystoscopy. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007:chap 6.


Review Date: 6/17/2010
Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington, School of Medicine; Scott Miller, MD, Urologist in private practice in Atlanta, Georgia. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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